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Signs of tendonitis and how to cure it

Signs of tendonitis and how to cure it

  • April 27, 2022
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Repetitive strain or motion is often the cause of tendonitis. We explain how this injury alerts you to be taken seriously because it could become chronic.

Muscles are attached to bones by long, fibrous structures called tendons, which are responsible for transmitting the necessary force from the muscle to the bone to generate movement.

When a tendon becomes inflamed, we speak of tendinitis. However, although it is painful, it is usually not given too much importance and we do not “take care” of the injury as we should. An error because it can be repeated and cause a degeneration of the tendon or tendinosis (chronic tendinitis) or even its rupture, explains the orthopaedic in Delhi.

THE SIGNS OF TENDONITIS

The symptoms that warn us that we suffer an injury of this type are the following:

  • Pain is the main symptom, either near the joint or along the course of the tendon.
  • The discomfort worsens with movement and is more intense at night.
  • Palpation or rubbing also hurts.
  • Sometimes the area is red, hot, and swollen.

When we go to the orthopaedic doctor in Delhi after suffering an injury of this type, in principle, it is enough for the specialist to carry out a physical examination to detect it. If there are doubts, then you can send complementary tests. An imaging test (X-ray, ultrasound, MRI or CT) is usually performed to make the diagnosis.

The pain is close to the joint and increases with movement

Tendinitis must be differentiated from a sprain, which would be an injury to the ligaments that support the joint. Of course, a badly healed sprain can end up in tendinitis, explains the orthopaedic in Dwarka.

WHO HAS MORE RISK OF SUFFERING IT?

Any tendon in the body can become inflamed, but the most common tendinitis affects the heel, shoulder, wrist, and elbow.

  • The most common that originates in athletes and young people due to repetitive efforts on an area of ​​the body, especially when exercising, or due to overload due to repeated use of a tendon, for example if the computer mouse is used for hours with a position wrong hand, says the orthopaedic in Dwarka.
  • An overly sedentary lifestyle also favors tendonitis: the muscles are not in shape and can suffer at the slightest effort.
  • It can also appear in older adults, due to aging and natural wear of the tissues.

A repetitive stress or overload on the tendon causes it

  • Shoes that squeeze and materials that are not suitable for the foot or misuse of these (for example, running without sports shoes), can aggravate or cause Achilles tendinitis to appear.
  • On the other hand, certain systemic diseases, such as diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis, are capable of causing its appearance. It’s not common, but cholesterol drugs like statins can also cause it, says the orthopaedic in west Delhi.

5 TYPES OF TENDINITIS

Depending on the tendon that is injured, tendinitis adopts one name or another:

  1. Achilles tendonitis occurs when the Achilles tendon is injured.
  2. “Tennis elbow” or lateral epicondylitis appears due to inflammation of the tendons that are inserted into the lateral aspect of the elbow.
  3. Golfer’s elbow or medial epicondylitis occurs when the tendons of the elbow inserted on the inside of the elbow are irritated.
  4. Rotator cuff tendinitis is caused by inflammation of the tendons in the shoulder.
  5. Lastly, “De Quervain’s tendinitis” is caused by inflammation of the tendons of the thumb.

PREVENTION AND TREATMENT

In reality, it is quite easy to prevent it: it is enough to avoid repetitive movements and joint overloads, maintaining adequate muscle tone and warming up before starting to exercise or work if we are going to carry out tasks that involve physical effort of any muscle group, suggests the orthopaedic doctor in West Delhi.

How is such an injury treated?

  • During the acute condition: rest, combined with anti-inflammatories and analgesics, is the main treatment, which is why the area is usually immobilized with plaster splints or prostheses.
  • Combining cold and heat also relieves. Thus, ice helps reduce inflammation in the first 48 hours after the onset of pain. Apply it to the area 3 or 4 times a day for 15 minutes. After that time, you will notice relief if you follow the same routine but applying heat.
  • In the most “stubborn” cases that are not resolved with rest and anti-inflammatories, it is advisable to do rehabilitation in a center or with the help of a physiotherapist.
  • And if the pain persists, it may be necessary to apply other techniques (such as local infiltration of corticosteroids) or even operate.

Muscles and joint flexibility should be exercised

There may be a greater predisposition to re-suffer tendinitis if the injury has not been properly healed, as the ligament is distended, making it more unstable. To prevent relapses, it is important to maintain and train joint mobility and flexibility, and strengthen the muscles that support the joint, says the orthopaedic doctor in Dwarka.